Sunday, August 02, 2009

My big fat rudbeckia “Herbstsonne”


These never should have been placed where they are: at the front of the sunny “corral” bed, obscuring other shorter plants that have managed to survive and blocking sun from anything I plant that might otherwise grow as tall.


They’re interesting though, starting out as fat green buds, then upward-facing yellow daisy-like flowers, then petals drooping down as the seedheads begin to form. Bees find them interesting too.


They look great from above. There is something wonderful about height in the garden—and, design-wise, the wisdom seems to be that verticality is the way to go for me, given the narrow lots and narrow tall buildings. I should likely move them to the back of the border, but I have plenty of tall action there already.


My other favorite rudbeckia has also begun to open—a not-as-tall triloba variant that has sunset-colored flowers. It blooms abundantly through fall.

Rudbeckia are not my favorite plant. I find the Goldsturm brassy and overplanted. But they do very well in this area and as long as I can find some interesting cultivars, they’ll always have a place in the garden.

18 comments:

Susan aka Miss R said...

Rudbeckia are not my favorites either but they bloom here when most everything else is finished and other things haven't really started yet. If the deer haven't gotten to them, 'Goldsturm' which is indeed overused, signals the beginning of the August doldrums.

Lisa at Greenbow said...

Rudbeckia are such easy plants to grow that is why everyone likes them so. All they need is a little space and sun. I like this one.

Anonymous said...

I kept reading rutabaga, and I couldn't figure out why that would be shading things. Also why it wouldn't fit in a corral bed.

/needs a cup of coffee this morning.

Sue said...

I got an herbstonne last year, and am enjoying it next to my house in the back of my border. It's about 7 or 8 feet tall.

Mr. McGregor's Daughter said...

I agree with you about 'Goldsturm,' and also prefer the color of 'Herbstonne,' which I have never grown. I like the look of tall things in front of shorter things. It keeps the garden from looking like a floral school group photo.

Pam said...

I've always thought the green buds were beautiful too - unfortunately mine were slept on by a dog in early spring, and so I missed the blooms this year. Thanks for sharing yours -

Sylvana said...

I think I have this in my garden, or at least something strikingly similar. I planted it to screen our yard from the alley. It does a fabulous job.

Yours seem to have nice fat petals. I like that.

Monica said...

http://green-house.tv/photo/shining-coneflower-who-loves?context=album&albumId=1359573:Album:42914

I love mine! Well, except that it tries to take everything over. I thinned it this year and will likely split it in the fall.

Your garden looks beautiful!
Monica

Cindy, My Corner of Katy said...

Why don't I have that Rudbeckia? I must remedy the situation this fall. The small-flowered R. triloba reseeds happily in the corner bed. There's another variety that keeps popping up in the rose bed, which isn't supposed to have yellow flowers. The best laid plans ...

Jean said...

'Goldsturm' is not over-used here. In fact, I rarely see it. Which must be why I like mine. :-) 'Herbstonne' is very cool looking.

Layanee said...

I do like the buds best as that school bus yellow screams unless it is a quarter mile away and then it just shouts.

Carol said...

"Interesting cultivars" is the key to some of the over-used flowers like Rudbeckia. I'm on the look-out for some...

jodi (bloomingwriter) said...

Isn't Herbstsonne awesome? Ours is heading for about 8 feet tall so far this year, and it's in a spot where it hangs out with other mega-perennials. We've had ooodles and oodles of rain this year so its not surprising that things in my garden are all giant. Including the weeds, of course, which I claim are all pollinator plants.

Miss Daisy said...

Well, I finally found you again! For some reason my "feed" wasn't connecting to your site, but I think I've got it fixed! Glad to be back. Your pictures of the Rudbeckia are lovely! Love the bee on the flower. Great clarity. I've changed my blog to a DOT COM, so I can be found at www.GardeningWithMissDaisy.com. Hope to see you there.

EAL said...

Welcome back, Miss Daisy. I'll add your blog to my reader, which, sad to say, I've neglected horribly!

Helen said...

For us, the R. triloba will bloom in dry shade where other rudbeckias (and, probably, rutabagas) tend to sulk. They seed themselves around quite willingly, too.

garden girl said...

I love Herbstsonne, and am glad it's sited at the back of the border here. The owner of the nursery where I work talked me into trying it. I'm glad he did, and it performs beautifully in mostly shade. I did have to stake them after several days of heavy wind, but that might not be an issue with more sun.

Goldsturm is indeed ubiquitous, but it will be staying here since it performs so well in dry shade and the blooms last so long.

Rudbeckias are among my favorite blooming plants, and I'm delighted they perform so well in mostly shade. They are the backbone of our late-summer shady garden.

Jacqueline D'Elia said...

Hello there. Very pretty Rubeckia. I just photographed pretty Lantana and waterlilies some for my blog, www.southernpost.net
Hope you'll have a look.

Jacqueline D'Elia